Day 2 brought with it this post from Cosmos the in Lost, which references both poetry and artistry with a nice reference to Johannes Paulus II, one of my favorite popes.

Incidentally, I always wanted to be Catholic; I wanted the mystery, the ritual, the silences. Instead, I was born into an Assemblies of God church, which is probably what prompted my interest in Catholicism.

In any case, I would like to make this my post for Day 2.

DAY 3
The poem that comes to mind is ‘One Art’ by Elizabeth Bishop. It is probably much over-used, but that does not diminish its significance in my life nor my interest in it as a poem. ‘One Art’ explores the art, or process, of loss. I have lost so many things in my life, from people to places to so many, many things. But I think that the loss that pierces the deepest is the loss of my self-esteem, my self-control, and my sense of humility or forgiveness. I am not saying that ‘One Art’ either captures or makes amends for these losses, simply that it does what poetry ought to do: it brings the truth of the feeling home.

So here is Elizabeth Bishop on Day 3:

ONE ART

 

One Art

by Elizabeth Bishop

The art of losing isn't hard to master;
so many things seem filled with the intent
to be lost that their loss is no disaster.

Lose something every day. Accept the fluster
of lost door keys, the hour badly spent.
The art of losing isn't hard to master.

Then practice losing farther, losing faster:
places, and names, and where it was you meant 
to travel. None of these will bring disaster.

I lost my mother's watch. And look! my last, or
next-to-last, of three loved houses went.
The art of losing isn't hard to master.

I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster,
some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent.
I miss them, but it wasn't a disaster.


—Even losing you (the joking voice, a gesture
I love) I shan't have lied.  It's evident
the art of losing's not too hard to master
though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster.

– See more at: http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15212#sthash.hERS8VVH.dpuf

One Art

by Elizabeth Bishop

The art of losing isn't hard to master;
so many things seem filled with the intent
to be lost that their loss is no disaster.

Lose something every day. Accept the fluster
of lost door keys, the hour badly spent.
The art of losing isn't hard to master.

Then practice losing farther, losing faster:
places, and names, and where it was you meant 
to travel. None of these will bring disaster.

I lost my mother's watch. And look! my last, or
next-to-last, of three loved houses went.
The art of losing isn't hard to master.

I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster,
some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent.
I miss them, but it wasn't a disaster.


—Even losing you (the joking voice, a gesture
I love) I shan't have lied.  It's evident
the art of losing's not too hard to master
though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster.

– See more at: http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15212#sthash.hERS8VVH.dpuf

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